iNEST
Natural Environment Sensor Terminal

Background

All Species of Sea Turtles are Affected by Climate Change.

Being reptiles, the genders of sea turtle hatchlings are temperature-dependant. In other words, the warmer the temperature, the more likely it is that hatchlings will be female. With increasing global temperatures, scientists predict that the gender-ratio of sea turtles will be skewed towards far more female hatchlings than male hatchlings. This sort of gender imbalance will impact the global sea turtle population and likely reduce their overall numbers.

Therefore, monitoring sea turtle nest conditions is important to further understand the nesting behaviour of hatchlings and the changes in sand temperature of the nests.

Research and Conservation with Cutting Edge Technology

As part of the ongoing conservation efforts, DevicesWorld has adapted its iSCADA platform to make it easier for scientists to conduct their research and monitoring of sea turtle nests on the beaches of Malaysia.

With it’s specially designed Natural Environment Sensor Terminal (iNEST) system, scientists can take advantage of iSCADA’s advanced data monitoring technologies to keep track of sea turtle egg clutches during incubation continuously and in real-time. 

 

iNEST

iNEST — Built on iSCADA Technology

iNEST is an environmentally conscious and socially responsible project by DevicesWorld, in conjunction with various other partners who are committed to studying and bettering our natural environment. It is also a wonderful demonstration of the adaptability of our iSCADA technology which enables real-time delivery of data via the Internet — anywhere, anytime and to anyone.

Whether it is to monitor data to cut energy costs, or for the pursuit of science, iSCADA delivers.

How Does iNEST Benefit Sea Turtles?

iNEST is an environmentally friendly, non-intrusive and self-sustaining monitoring system that delivers real-time data on the eggs’ incubation process with minimal disturbances to the natural environment of the nest. The system allows scientists to understand more on how, where and when sea turtles nest, thereby giving us valuable insight into how we can better protect the nesting habitats of these wonderful creatures.

Where Has iNEST Been Implemented?

Currently, the system is installed in Chagar Hutang, Pulau Redang, Malaysia. It consists of 7 junctions that are able to monitor a total of 12 turtle nests simultaneously and 2 control nests where one is placed under the sun and the other in the shade.

How it Works

Sensors

Sensors

Currently, temperature and vibration sensors are placed at 3 different levels of the sea turtle nest: top, middle and bottom.

Solar Panel

Solar Panel

A solar panel connected to an environmentally friendly battery is fixed atop each junction. Solar energy is used to generate sufficient power to run the system and for daily activities.

Junction

Junction

The iNEST system consists of 7 junctions that houses the various sensors. It is designed to accommodate 4 different types of sensors: light, humidity, vibration, and temperature.

Master Panel

Master Panel

The Master Panel on the beach collects data from every junction and transmits it to the mini server laptop in the cabin that is connected to the satellite.

Satellite

Satellite

The satellite system connects to the Internet via a mini server laptop, enabling both real time monitoring of the iNEST system at any location and data transfers to and from the iSCADA server. Communication is also possible between the team on the island and main land.

Real-Time Data

Real-Time Data

With our iNEST infrastructure in place on-site, iSCADA technology allows researchers to view all the important data in real time on their phones, computers and other internet-enabled device anywhere, anytime.

Committed to the Environment

iNEST

Universiti Malaysia Terengganu & SEATRU

The University of Malaysia Terengganu’s (UMT) Sea Turtle Research Unit (SEATRU) has been studying the ecology and behaviour of sea turtles for more than a decade. With a small team of full time staff, the unit depends greatly on volunteer manpower for their continued effectiveness.

Through the years, countless volunteers have given up their time, staying for week-long stretches on the island in order to assist the research and conservation effort. With the atmosphere in the camp being one of good cheer and camaraderie, the unit works well with volunteers from all walks of life and serves as both a wonderful escape from the hustle and bustle of city life, and a poignant reminder of the impact humans are able to have on the ecology of nature.

To join in the conservation efforts, learn more about the program and how to volunteer, do explore the SEATRU official site via the button below: